You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘fujoshi’ category.

Name: Tohno, Maria (遠野まりあ)
Alias: N/A
Relationship Status: Single
Origin: Cyber Yaoi Girl

Information:
A fellow student at the same school as Tanaka Mitsuki, Maria is also a fan of yaoi and the manga Ai no Doronuma. Unlike Mitsuki who is a closet fujoshi, however, Maria wears her fandom on her sleeve, showing no restraint in expressing her interest in BL and related topics. In addition to being an avid reader of yaoi, Maria also draws doujinshi as part of a circle.

Fujoshi Level:
Lacking any sort of inhibition, Maria is even willing to ask her teacher in the middle of class if he’s gay.

Name: Inuzuka, Shino (犬塚志乃)
Alias: Wanko (わんこ)
Relationship Status: Single
Origin: Cyber Yaoi Girl

Information:
A hard-working career woman at a pharmaceutical company, Inuzuka Shino is also known online as Wanko, owner of a popular and prominent Ai no Doronuma yaoi fansite. Able to balance her work and home life fairly well, Shino constantly wonders how to improve her site both on a design level as well as the underlying hardware required to run it. She also designs animated gifs.

Inuzuka is good friends with other members of the Ai no Doronuma fan community, including relative novice Tanaka Mitsuki. Shino is often too high-level for Mitsuki, her fujoshi mindset knowing almost no boundaries. Though Inuzuka occasionally gets into relationships, she will sometimes completely forget about the guy’s existence and go hang out with her friends.

Fujoshi Level:
Shino is able to view Osama Bin Laden and Omar Sheikh as a yaoi couple, but is unable to do the same with George W. Bush because, according to her, it is impossible to pair uncute idiots.

This month I’m happy to say that the Ogiue Maniax Patreon is currently at almost $100, thanks to my generous patrons both new and old. Even getting close to the three-digit mark is kind of like a dream, and I hope to continue to provide interesting content for my readers.

This past month, I’ve gotten around to making a number of posts I’ve been planning for a while, most notably my review of the fujoshi friendship manga Fujoshissu!, my first look at DLC character Mewtwo in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS & Wii U, and my review of the anime about anime, SHIROBAKO. In the case Fujoshissu! I’d been anticipating writing the review of years.

This month’s special Patreon sponsors are:

Ko Ransom

Alex

Johnny Trovato

anonymous (not Capital A “Anonymous”)

One of my contributors wanted to remain anonymous, but because they fulfilled the “Decide My Fate” tier, I wanted to mention them as I am writing a special post this month. As always, if you’d like to request a topic for me to write, you can pledge $30 or more to my Patreon.  If you don’t want to or can’t contribute that much every month, you can always change the amount to something lower, or force a maximum limit on how much you give.

For this month, I’d like to ask what people want to see out of my rewards and goals. I understand that my goals and sponsor rewards aren’t exactly world-shattering, and while I’m certainly not willing to sell myself out, I’m curious as to what people would like to see. Perhaps Skype conversations once a week on any topic? Post requests with unique twists? Drawing requests? I’m not sure if I’d be able to do everything, but I’d like to at least offer more.

In terms of milestones, I’m open to suggestions. How would people feel about a tongue-in-cheek negative review of Genshiken and/or the character review of Ogiue?

If you were to ask me about my favorite fujoshi-themed manga, I would predictably answer that it’s Genshiken Nidaime. However, if you were to ask me this question before 2010 (when Genshiken re-started), I would have said Fujoshissu!: Maniac High School Girls Comedy by Okachimachi Hato. I’ve mentioned it a few times over the years on Ogiue Maniax, and have even devoted multiple Fujoshi Files to its characters, but I’ve never really spoken about it to any major extent. Now that the manga has concluded after seven years of publication, I find that it’s all the more important that I share what has been one of my favorite manga in recent memory.

Fujoshissu! (meaning “We’re fujoshi!”) is the story of three fujoshi friends who have to navigate high school while in different stages of their romantic relationships. Satou Megumi is the artist of the group and meets a classmate working at a convenience store and developing a mutual attraction. Aoi Yuki is the resident cosplayed, who begins the series already dating her childhood friend. Yoshizawa Eri is the writer, and who finds herself attracted to her younger brother’s best friend.

Though this seems to follow more or less the formula of so many other manga and especially fujoshi-themed manga, what appealed to me about Fujoshissu! from the very beginning was its approach to portraying its characters, as well as their connections to both each other and their respective boyfriends. In many manga about female otaku, be they fujoshi or otherwise, characters are portrayed as having their fandoms factor extremely heavily into how they find significant others. Boys will fall in love with fujoshi because they love their honest enthusiasm, or girls will work actively to hide their BL fandom. Though generally meaning well, these series often reduce their characters to bare-bones elements, with little characterization beyond the extent of their fandom.

Though this has changed since 2008 when the manga first began, I do think it’s important to note how much Fujoshissu! treats the fact of their fujoshi identities very naturally, especially in the development of their respective romances. Being fujoshi is shown to be very much a part of their identities, yet it is not their sole defining trait or the only impetus for their interactions with others. Their relationships do not hinge on whether or not they can accept their fujoshi selves or whether or not the boys are either attracted to or learn to love their energy, but are more multifaceted concerns having to do with topics such as concern for the future, worrying about personality compatibility, body image, among other things.

In regards to body image in particular, the character Eri is focused on extensively, and her story really explores the idea in ways that are frequently ignored in manga in general. Eri is depicted as short and chubby, and not just “chubby because the manga says she is” as one often finds in series (Yomi in Azumanga Daioh being a notable example). Though not lacking in fashion sense, she reveals over the course of the manga that, due to having internalized a great deal of bullying she experienced when she was younger, she doesn’t believe herself to be beautiful. To Eri, her fashion choices compensate against her own self-perceived ugliness, and she doesn’t even believe her own boyfriend when he says he finds her to be attractive. The combination of not just having this subject talked about but having a character who at first glance reasonably shows through her design why she would come to this conclusion is remarkably poignant, as is the ultimate resolution of this particular narrative.

Even with subjects this emotionally heavy, however, the manga always feels delightfully romantic and fun because of how close and invigorating the friendship between the three main girls is depicted to be. The depths of their personalities come across in times of joy just as much if not more than in times of pain, and their shared hobby of anime, manga, and BL becomes the lens through which we see this deep friendship. It also embraces a manga aesthetic that for the most part can be called shoujo, but the roughness of the artwork is not quite the same as what you’d normally see, more of a BL style that’s been re-translated back into shoujo such that it embraces the expressive qualities of its own lines much more thoroughly.

Interestingly, Fujoshissu! runs in Sylph a magazine largely devoted to BL stories. While the subject matter of fujoshi isn’t that far off, it also shows that a manga title need not be entirely beholden to its own magazine’s themes, and that readers of BL can have just as much interest reading manga about other topics. This isn’t exactly a revelation, especially with magazines such as the recent Comic it, which advertises itself as being manga for female otaku that aren’t so obsessed with love, but the fact that Fujoshissu! successfully ran for seven years shows that this quality is appreciated.

If you liked this post, consider becoming a sponsor of Ogiue Maniax through Patreon. You can get rewards for higher pledges, including a chance to request topics for the blog.

Name: Okamoto, Yuriko (岡本百合子)
Alias: Elizabeth (エリザベス)
Relationship Status: Married
Origin: Cyber Yaoi Girl

Information:
Okamoto Yuriko leads two lives. When she is at home, she is a respectable wife and mother from a well-to-do traditional family, clad in a kimono. When among her fellow yaoi fans, however, Yuriko becomes “Elizabeth,” clad in gothic lolita and Harajuku-esque fashions. When asked why she wears such clothing, Yuriko insists that it’s because they look good on her, though those around her tend to disagree.

Yuriko is one of the fans Tanaka Mitsuki befriends as she becomes a part of the online Ai no Doronuma fandom. Yuriko runs her own Aidoro fansite, and also writes yaoi short stories. She also defends her son’s use of the internet despite her mother-in-law’s claims that it hurts his grades.

Fujoshi Level:
Yuriko once walked into a situation with her husband and his mistress, and then mentally turned the woman into a guy in order to fuel her next yaoi short story.

Name: Chiemi (ちえみ)
Alias: Mameyoshi (まめ吉)
Relationship Status: Married
Origin: Cyber Yaoi Girl

Information:
A mother of newborn fraternal boy twins, Chiemi is a member of the Ai no Doronuma yaoi fandom known online as Mameyoshi. Though her husband is initially unaware of her hobbies, the extremely graphic auto-completes while typing in Japanese on their family computer eventually reveals the truth. As a result, their interactions turn somewhat antagonistic.

Chiemi loves her sons, though she begrudges the fact that having them means she cannot go to Comic Market for quite a few years.

Fujoshi Level:
Before her sons were born, Chiemi thought up a variety of otaku-themed names. After their birth, she designates one the “seme” and one the “uke,” and also encourages their close “brotherly” bonds.

Name: Sakasegawa, Rinko (逆瀬川倫子)
Alias: Ponta (ポン太)
Relationship Status: Divorced
Origin: Cyber Yaoi Girl

Information:
Sakasegawa Rinko is a high-class OL. Often misunderstood by her co-workers as being a very sexually active woman, Rinko actually spends most of her time online browsing yaoi sites. She is one of the many fans of Ai no Doronuma Tanaka Mitsuki meets as she discovers online yaoi fandom.

Rinko has a wealthy ex-husband, who despite his good looks and talents is actually quite desperate and needy. Though Rinko treats him with mild disdain and great pity, her husband basks in this pathetic “interaction.”

Fujoshi Level:
One of the reasons Rinko divorced her husband was because his need for attention was interfering with her time chatting with fellow yaoi fans.

Name: Urashima, Hono (浦島帆乃)
Alias: N/A
Relationship Status: Single
Origin: f ningyo

Information:
A freshman college student at the university where marine biologist Tsubaki Reiji teaches and the BL-loving mermaid Mero resides, Urashima Hono comes to college interested in snagging lots of guys. However, she instead becomes a friend of sorts with Mero, who teaches her the way of the fujoshi.

Fujoshi Level:
Urashima has only just begun to adopt a fujoshi mindset, but is helped along by Mero.

comicit-issue1-cover

Last month, the publisher Kadokawa Ascii Media Works announced a new manga magazine. Comic it advertises itself as a publication for “adult otaku girls” who “want more than just romance in their stories.” As if to emphasize its defiance of the common trope that manga for women revolve around love stories, its first issue came out on Valentine’s Day.

I find a few things fascinating about the premise behind Comic it. I’ve often seen readers, male and female, criticize shoujo and josei manga for being so focused on romance, that it seems to come at the exclusion of other possible and interesting narratives. However, it is quite intriguing that the demographic that is assumed to be most dissatisfied with the state of manga for female readers would be otaku, hardcore fans of manga. This also assumes that for many non-otaku readers, the state of manga, and romance in manga, is fine. Of course, the idea that there should be “more than just romance” also implies that the manga in this magazine will still feature love and relationships.

There’s another aspect of their advertising, however, that is less apparent. The term “adult otaku girls,” or onna otaku joshi, essentially indicates grown women who are otaku, but are still girls at heart. Though they continue to age, they’ve never let go of the thrill of being otaku. In a way, this seemingly feeds into the celebration of you that is common to Japanese culture and its portrayal in anime and manga, but I wonder if it’s also a jab at it, that youth is a product of the mind, rather than the body.

Below I’ve translated a chart included with the article on Natalie Comic linked above, which is designed to help readers figure out which stories in Comic it they’d enjoy. Note that all of the possible results emphasize the word “girl” instead of “woman” in the same manner as described above, and that there are some… interesting… yes/no questions on this chart.

comicit-chart-translation

According to the article, these categories indicate the following.

Kizuna Girl: You’re into families and brothers, and are moved by connections and bonds.

Mama Girl: You’re into helpless guys and the dramatic joy of seeing them change, as if you were a mother or older sister.

Fujoshi: You’re into buddy stories and past connections, and special relationships between guys

Subculture Girl: Though you appear to be just like everyone else, you’re actually a little peculiar, and you’re interested in philosophies of love that are a bit different.

I’ve yet to read Comic it, but I’m highly interested in doing so. I’ve already ordered a volume, and  plan to review it for Ogiue Maniax in the future.

If you liked this post, consider becoming a sponsor of Ogiue Maniax through Patreon. You can get rewards for higher pledges, including a chance to request topics for the blog.

Name: Mero (メロ)
Alias: N/A
Relationship Status: Single
Origin: f ningyo

Information:
Mero is a mermaid who is discovered by a marine biologist named Tsubaki Reiji. Having spent much of her young life under the water reading BL, her fellow mermaids failed to understand her fascination with the human world. Upon reaching the surface, she finds herself caught up in a series of misunderstandings with Reiji and those close to him, partly because of her own mistaken assumptions about humankind, and partly because everyone else is equally dim in their own rights.

Fujoshi Level:
Mero actually believes that BL is a 100% accurate reflection of human life, and so assumes that all men are in love with each other.

Interested in Supporting Ogiue Maniax?

Twitter

Got anything to say?

Archives

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,833 other followers

%d bloggers like this: